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How millennials fund their trips

Millennials are everywhere. They are known for having a serious case of wanderlust, thus becoming one of today’s most powerful forces in the travel industry. 

How millennials fund their trips
Majority or 84 percent of Filipino millennials travel at least once a year.
An in-app survey by classifieds marketplace Carousell found that 84 percent of Filipino millennials travel at least once a year. Out of which, 37 percent spend more than P15,000 on a single trip. 

This generation’s love of exploring the world make others wonder: how do millennials fund their trips?

The Carousell Travel Attitudes Survey revealed four out of 10 take advantage of online selling to earn extra cash, including selling their pre-loved items online to fulfill their travel goals. 

“The value in underused items can be surprisingly significant. According to Carousell’s historical data, Filipino Carousellers make an average of P26,000 selling their underused items,” said Carousell Philippines marketing executive Marita Galvez.

She continued, “Electronics and gadgets have the highest demand on the marketplace and the resale value is high. For example, an iPhone X sold on Carousell is equivalent to funding a round trip to Japan.”

The survey found a Macbook Air, which is sold at P23,000 on average on Carousell, can fund a full package Indochina (Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand) tour, while laptops which could fetch P70,000 can be used for a round trip flight to Korea. Cameras and gaming consoles like PS4 are also popular pre-loved items sold in the app.

Since its launch in the Philippines in 2016, Carousell has become one of the fastest growing mobile classifieds marketplace where people can buy, sell, and connect with one another. Here in the country, there are more than 9.5 million listings in the Carousell marketplace with more than 2.7 million items sold to date.

How millennials fund their trips
Millennials sell their pre-loved items, mostly gadgets, online to fulfil their travel goals. 
“I’m a student and have always depended on my parents to fund our trips. I’m about to graduate and Carousell has helped me become more independent. With my earnings from Carousell, I was able to fund my latest family trip,” shared Gabrielle Estrada, 21 year-old Carousell user. 

To encourage young filipinos to chase their travel dreams, the app has collaborated with travel blogger David Guison to conduct a sharing session “Lifehacks from a Millennial Traveller” with the Carousell community. 

“Traveling has introduced me to diverse cultures and to new perspectives. While blogging is my main source of income, I do have other side gigs to fund my travels such as photography, styling, and even selling my underused items for extra cash,” shared Guison.  

Here are some of the tips from David Guison: 

• Invest in experiences, not things

If you have underused items lying in your house, you should sell them to fund your trips. The experience you have from travel will exceed the value of those items.

• Do your research when you sell your underused items

When it comes to selling, you should always do your research on the market price. 

• Save money on travel gear by buying second-hand 

How millennials fund their trips
Millennials are everywhere. They are known for having a serious case of wanderlust, thus becoming one of today’s most powerful forces in the travel industry. 
Travel gear like backpacks and cameras can be costly when bought brand new. Buying them second-hand from Carousell is not only practical but also environmentally-friendly. 

Topics: millennials , Carousell , Carousell Travel Attitudes Survey , travel , Marita Galvez , David Guison
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